This is My Quest and Canning Homemade Enchilada Sauce

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Homemade Enchilada Sauce for Canning

“What is your name?”

“Cery.”

“What is your quest?”

“I seek the holy grail.” (Of food, anyway.)

“What is your favorite color?”

“Purple.  Duh!”

 

Ok, now that’s out of the way and I can concentrate. 🙂 My current quest is actually to replace all of the things that I threw out of my pantry with healthy, real food alternatives. Well, OK, so maybe not everything. I’m not sure that anyone could come up with a healthy version of sweetened condensed milk. Le sigh. While some things have been relatively easy, some things have presented me with more of a challenge. Especially the mixes and boxed meals I used to use on THOSE nights. You know the ones I mean. I know that if I had those available I would be less likely to hit a drive through on the way home or slap a PB&J on the plate and call it good.

*cue dramatic music and announcer with really deep voice*  And thus the quest was begun. *more dramatic music*

As I come up with replacements for those cans, boxes, and packages I will share them with you. Pinky promise. To get this thing kicked off I’m sharing my homemade enchilada sauce. Cuz, you know, Mexican food is my favorite food group! 🙂 I chose to make a ridiculously large quantity so I could pressure can it and keep some on hand. Feel free to scale it (way) down. Or up.

Learn all about home canning here.

Homemade Enchilada Sauce for Canning

As written, this enchilada sauce recipe needs to be pressure canned. To use a waterbath canner, add 1 Tbsp bottled lemon juice to each pint jar before filling with sauce. Then process for 35 minutes.

Homemade Enchilada Sauce

  • 20 pounds ripe tomatoes
  • 1 large onion
  • 1 large head of garlic
  • 5 Tbsp Chili powder (use more or less to your liking)
  • 2 1/2 Tbsp sea salt
  • hot peppers (optional)

Coring and Removing Skins

The first thing you’ll want to do is to slip the skins from the tomatoes. It takes a little time, but it makes it easier later on. Put water in a dutch oven and bring to a boil. Put cold water in your sink and add some ice. I keep old milk bottles filled with water in the freezer for things like this. When you’re finished with it just re-freeze it. When the water comes to a boil, put some tomatoes in it. Don’t crowd them. Leave them in for a count of 30.

heatin' em up

heatin’ em up

Then put them in the cold water.

coolin' em down

coolin’ em down

When they’re cool enough to handle, get your cool little corer gadget and take out the cores.

easy as 1...

easy as 1…

2...

2…

3!

3!

Next, slip the skins off.

slips right off

slips right off

Quarter the tomatoes and put them in a large stockpot. Use a potato masher or some similar device and smash a bunch of them in the bottom of the pot. You want to make sure that you have enough liquid in the bottom so that they don’t stick and burn. Cuz sticking and burning is bad.

no sticking here!

no sticking here!

Next, take your onion and chop it up. Then peel the garlic cloves.

ready to go in the pot

ready to go in the pot

Throw them in the pot. Well, not really throw because throwing food is not allowed in the house. So place them gently into the pot. If you are using peppers, now is the time to add those guys to. Remember to use gloves when chopping and seeding hot peppers. I don’t use peppers in mine. I’m kinda wimpy when it comes to hot spicy stuff. But you spice it up as much as you want. 🙂 Now, bring it all to a boil.

really hot tomatoes

really hot tomatoes

Cooking & Pureeing

After it comes to a boil, reduce the heat and simmer for 30 minutes. Leave the lid off so that some of the liquid boils away. Take the pot off the heat and allow the tomatoes and stuff to cool for a few minutes. Because now you’re going to put it all in the blender to puree it. And if it’s too hot when you turn the blender on, the top of the blender will shoot off into the air with a sonic boom and the force of an atomic explosion and splatter tomato insides all over your ceiling. Or so I’ve heard. So, please, let it cool a little.

post blending with lid intact

post blending with lid intact

If you want to take the seeds out, now is the time to do it. Pour it into a food mill and press it into a clean stockpot to get all the seeds out and make it smooth.

no seediness here

no seediness here

Bring it all back to a boil and reduce the heat again so it is just simmering. Simmer until it is the consistency that you want. Add the chili powder and salt. Give it a taste and adjust the seasonings to your liking, then put the enchilada sauce into pint sized canning jars. You can store it in the freezer or can it. If freezing, leave about an inch and a half headroom so the jars don’t crack.

Canning

If you want to can it, you need to use a pressure canner. Can in pint jars. Process your lids as directed by the manufacturer. Wash and rinse your jars and keep hot til needed. Ladle the hot enchilada sauce into hot jars. Wipe the rims with a clean damp cloth and seat the lids. Put on the rings and tighten finger tight. Process at 6lbs pressure for 20 minutes, following the directions that came with your canner. And be sure to follow the directions for your altitude.

As a bonus, if you don’t add anything except the salt, it makes a great tomato soup. I canned a bunch of that too. A two-fer. Because I am just that awesome. 🙂

Blessings!




Homemade Enchilada Sauce for Canning
Enchilada Sauce

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Print Recipe

This sauce is great for either freezing or canning, and the fire-factor is whatever level you want it to be.

Enchilada Sauce

Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!

Print Recipe

This sauce is great for either freezing or canning, and the fire-factor is whatever level you want it to be.

Servings Prep Time Cook Time
8pints 30minutes 1-2hours
Servings Prep Time
8pints 30minutes
Cook Time
1-2hours

Ingredients
  • 20 pounds tomatoes
  • 1 large onion roughly chopped
  • 1 large head garlic peeled
  • 5 Tbsp chili powder
  • 2 1/2 Tbsp sea salt
  • peppers (optional)

Servings: pints

Units:

Ingredients
  • 20 pounds tomatoes
  • 1 large onion roughly chopped
  • 1 large head garlic peeled
  • 5 Tbsp chili powder
  • 2 1/2 Tbsp sea salt
  • peppers (optional)

Servings: pints

Units:

Instructions
  1. Slip the skins on the tomatoes.
  2. Core and quarter and add to stockpot.
  3. Using a potato masher, mash some of the tomatoes so there is liquid in the bottom of the pot.
  4. Add chopped onions, peeled garlic, and seeded and chopped hot peppers if using.
  5. Bring to a boil, stirring frequently so it doesn’t stick.
  6. Reduce heat and simmer for 30 minutes. Don’t cover the pot so it can start to reduce.
  7. Remove from heat and let cool for about 10 minutes.
  8. In batches, place in a blender and puree.
  9. If you want to remove the seeds, pour into a food mill and press into a clean stockpot.
  10. Return to a boil and reduce to a simmer.
  11. Simmer until it is the consistency that you want.
  12. Add chili powder and salt. If you like to heat things up, you can add any peppers that you want at this time. Adjust seasonings to taste.
  13. Put in pint jars and process at 6 pounds pressure for 20 minutes. Remember to adjust for your altitude.

Recipe Notes

This enchilada sauce can be canned or frozen.  If you don’t add the chili powder, it makes a great tomato soup.

As written, this recipe needs to be pressure canned. To use a waterbath canner, add 1 Tbsp bottled lemon juice to each pint jar before filling with sauce. Then process for 35 minutes.

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5 comments on “This is My Quest and Canning Homemade Enchilada Sauce

    • Hi Bonnie! That’s a great question. If I’m just using regular tomatoes, it sometimes takes an hour or more depending on the amount of water in them. If I’m using Romas or other paste tomatoes, sometimes it’s thick enough after I puree it. So it depends on the tomatoes and how thick you like your sauce. 🙂

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